Category: Laser Cutter

All the Smaug related posts

What a difference a lens makes

So we have been. having a great time with our new 100w Baracudda Laser from Light Object. Like any laser, there are fun times to be had with focus, and so on.

We have a slight wobble at high speeds and tight art we are fighting along with just learning what is the best default configuration for a wide community of users.

Below are a few picks today that show the difference between what I am getting with different lenses. I am cutting on 1/8 inch cabinet grade Russian birch plywood.

The one on the left was cut with a 2″ lens with these settings

  • Cut: 30/55/50
  • Partial Cut 55/12/12
  • Etch: 400/30/.1

The one on the right was cut with a 2.5″ lens with these settings

  • Cut: 30/35/30
  • Partial Cut 200/12/12
  • Etch: 600/30/.1

As you can see for the partial cut and sharp detail the 2″ lens was a way better bet.

 

Made at AMT-June 2019

NOMCOM Fob All The Things dashboard | AMT Software • Bodie/Crafty
Hand Built Speaker | Workshop • David
Recycling Game | Workshop/Laser • Bernard M.
Solid wood credenza | Workshop | Raj J.
Tiny electronic brass jewelry | Electronics | Ray A.
RFID Mint Dispensing Box | Laser+Electronics | Crafty
Wood Signage | CNC Router | James L.
Fabric Kraken stuffed with 720 LEDs | Textiles + Electronics | Crafty
nevertheless she persisited

Laser Cut Custom Jewelry

So this was an ambitious workshop where each person got to make a few pieces of custom laser cut jewelry out of wood or leather.

We learned a lot at this workshop. With a bit of restructuring, I would be interested in doing this again. All proceeds went to the new serger fund.

laser cut oakland tree pendants
Oakland tree
Makers
Cutting Leather
leather stars
Red leather bracelet with etched Oakland skyline
Oakland Sky
hands scrubbing pink leather cut like stars
laser cut folded leather earing
pile of colorful leathers

Fusion 360 Hangout at AMT

December 7th we started a new meet up for Fusion 360.

The group brainstormed on tool-path creation and resolved to develop an understanding of multi-stage CAM processes that can be used on the various mills, routers and cutters at AMT.

We had a terrific time at the hangout. Matt our 3D Printing steward and five others attended. All were quite experienced Fusion 360 users, in contrast to most of the previous Fusion meetings which tend to be weighted toward newcomers. I think everyone present was a AMT member.

We opted to pass the projector cord around and look at all of our projects as a group. Another approach might be to break off into twos or threes; maybe we’ll try it that way next time.

  • Bob showed us some renderings of cool guitar designs he’s been working on.
  • Rachel (aka Dr. Shiney) showed us a guitar body a client of hers needed cut; we struggled together for a while trying to figure out Fusion’s 3D tool-path generation. I think something like this would be a great thing to get Taylor’s input on: A multi-stage CAM process including facing, profiling, and 3D carving.
  • Emory gave us a quick look at his own CAM project, which involved re-mounting the workpiece to cut both sides: tricky stuff.
  • Chelsea showed us her silicone casting project. She’s come up with a pretty elaborate flask and core to be 3D printed. We’re all anxious to see the results, but those are going to be some long prints! I recommended smaller test pieces to get sizes and clearances right and generally experiment with the process before committing to the final design.
  • Matt brought along a bunch of finished projects you’ve probably seen before if you’re a regular at our Thursday meetings; nothing new, but all done in Fusion 360.