Author: Crafty Rachel

I like to make wearables and laser random things. I have been a member since March 2012 and really have a good time at Ace Makerspace My background is in front-end developments and design. I currently work as an independent consultant doing all manner of things.

ace makerspace banner

Anti-Racist Education for Makers

Ace is thrilled to introduce 4 workshops in October that explore how to be anti-racist in our maker communities. Working with an amazing peace activist and facilitator, Emily Bowen, these workshops have been crafted to be broadly relevant to the maker community and Ace Makerspace specifically. 

Schema of Makers

Sunday, October 4th  |   Noon – 1pm PST

$5-20 sliding scale  |  Tickets

Who defines what a legitimate maker is? Explore how different types of makers are valued and have influence in how the community is shaped.

Communities are like ecosystems — living things that change and evolve over time. We will unpack different maker identities and the dynamics of those identities and their influence on how our makerspace community has evolved… for good or for ill. This workshop will explore both what the identity of makers have been as well as explore what it could and should be.

Maker Say What

Sunday, October 11th  |   Noon – 1pm PST

$5-20 sliding scale  |   Tickets

How the language we use to share maker knowledge interacts with race.

When it’s easy to lean into jargon as a way to communicate intelligence and experience, one can quickly conflate the words we use with who belongs and who doesn’t. And when it comes to talking about issues of race and gender, there is often a fear of saying the wrong thing. This workshop will explore how to be inclusive with Maker speak, as well as how to avoid the pitfalls of inaction by the fear of talking about race imperfectly.

Taking Care of the New Guy

Sunday, October 18th  |   Noon – 1pm PST

$5-20 sliding scale  |   Tickets

When the new guy isn’t white or a guy. We will explore where there is an opportunity to connect with people different than ourselves. 

Black people, and other people of color as well as Indigenous individuals, generally experience trauma because of microaggressions or just a lack of welcome in majority-white spaces. So to do female, femme, non-binary, and gender-nonconforming folx in majority male spaces. How then do we take care of new individuals when they are not like us or having a much different experience in the world.  This workshop will leave participants with a checklist to do just that including positive accountability.

You’re Too Comfortable

Sunday, October 25th  |   Noon – 1pm PST

$5-20 sliding scale  |   Tickets

Recognizing when comfort is an indicator of white supremacy manifesting itself. Explore how to take action when it does.

One way whiteness protects itself is by eliminating stressors of those who are in proximity to it. Things are easier, quicker, more accessible, more abundant, less risky, and more. This workshop will examine how comfortable you are and explore where your own discomfort might be putting up barriers to equity and inclusivity. Then we’ll talk about what can be done about it. We will uncover what actions can be taken when we discover white supremacy manifesting itself.

 

About our facilitator

Emily BowenEmily Bowen, MA ABS  (they /them)
The Peace Nerd

Emily trained as a psychotherapist, as well as earning a graduate degree in leadership and organizational development from Bastyr University (LIOS) in 2009. Since then they have worked as a Holistic Leadership Consultant and Educator. Emily is a founding member of the Peace Innovation Network (a collaboration between Stanford’s Peace Innovation Lab and The Hague). They studied Racial Equity for Adaptive Leadership at Leadership Eastside with Nikum Pon. And they are certified in Gracious Space – a framework for courageous conversations that was developed by the Center for Ethical Leadership.

Emily likes to help the people they’ve partnered with to seek a better understanding of their challenges and to find creative, equitable, and sustainable solutions. They possess an easy, natural confidence, insatiable curiosity, and a sense of humor that can be useful in guiding people in their growth and success. They bring essential skills in adult education, facilitation, coaching, innovation, and communication.

mask and sewing machine

Learn to Sew While Making Masks

Make masks for under-resourced folks in Oakland while learning to sew!
This is part sewing workshop and part mask-making party. Ace Makerspace provides masks to the community via our program Oakland Community PPE. We focus on distributing masks by partnering with existing social good organizations in Oakland. Learn more about where masks go on the Oakland Community PPE page.
You will learn or improve your sewing skills guided by experienced instructors. We split this offering into one virtual event and one live event at Ace Makerspace. We highly recommend that folks who have never sewn attend the virtual class before coming to the mask-making workshop.

Learn to sew while Making Masks Virtual Prep Class

During this 1-hour virtual class you will learn:

  • A sewing machine overview
  • How sewing machines work
  • Common sewing tools and what they are for
  • What goes into to making a mask

Demonstrations will include:

  • Straight stitching
  • Changing the needle
  • Seam ripping
  • Troubles shooting

There will be the time in this workshop to ask questions!

Learn to sew mask-making workshop

This event at Ace Makerspace is a combination of Class and Mask Making party. You will learn or improve your sewing skills guided by experienced instructors. Folks will work in rotation at stations giving everyone a chance to work on all aspects of mask-making. Lessons will be projected as the come up in real working situations.

Prerequisites

  • COVID-19 Safety
  • Are you brand new to sewing? Take the Virtual Prep class.
  • Experienced sewists looking to gain practice or just help make masks can skip the prep class that goes over the basics.

What you will learn

  • Sewing basics
  • Machine control
  • Chain stitching
  • Basic machine upkeep for volume stewing
  • Volume Sewing
  • Factory methods
  • Mask assembly
  • Reading assembly markings

Tools we will use

  • Sewing machines
  • Threaders
  • Clips

More about COVID Safety

In Order to stay COVID safety, we do much of the teaching using a “jumbotron” to project lessons on the wall. We also ask that all students take the COVID-19 safety course and masks are required.

festival mask

Hack your mask with valves

The “dirt-bike” or sports dust masks are really popular. A lot of folks know them from using them at events like Burning Man and Coachella. The issue with a lot of “dirt bike” style masks is the exhalation valves which are totally unfiltered. This makes these masks pretty useless for COVID-19 safety. You can read more about what the CDC says about masks with valves.

Everything I used for this 2-min hack:

  • CLUX Mesh Black Face Mask with Black Carbon Filter by Continental Luxury (amazon)
  • small (not tiny) rubber bands – one for each valve
  • Scissors
  • Non-Woven Polypropylene Fabric (woven fabric will work too)

I assembled the mask according to manufacturers’ directions. I cut the filter fabric to go over the valve with a very generous overlap – you can always cut off the excess. Then I slipped the rubber band over 2 layers of filter fabric to secure it to the Valve. This covers the valve and any leaky spots around the opening.

sport mask disassembled
Sport mask as it comes all disassembled. Most of these require assembly.
value hole on mesh part of the mask
The valve hole in the mask without the “hardware”
fabric, mask, and rubber band
Assembled mask with quick filter materials
filtered valve
the filter “value-cover” takes about 3 seconds to put on.
filtered valve close up
the “valve-cover” close up
respirator and tools

Respirator Hack for Covid

So the issue with a lot of respirators and dust masks is the exhalation valve which is totally unfiltered. This makes them pretty useless for COVID-19 safety. You can read more about what the CDC says about masks with valves.

Everything I used for this 5-min hack:

  • 3M Rugged Comfort Half Facepiece Reusable Respirator 6502QL (Medium)
  • Electrical tape
  • Scissors
  • Non-Woven Polypropylene Fabric (woven fabric will work too)

Check out the gallery below to see how I added a filter to my valve. I specifically added it to the outside so it would last longer before getting moist and so others could see it. I used two layers of material for the filter.

tool bucket

New Habits for Keeping Safe

The new reality around COVID-19 safety has us all scrambling to create new habits while we go about the business of making things. We are currently trying and experiment with tool caddy’s. The idea is:

  • Come into the shop, and pick up a caddy
  • As you use hand tools put them in the bucket
  • Once you are done sanitize them and but them back

This way you don’t have to stop and sanitize with every tool and we avoid cross-contamination. Each bucket also has a small spray bottle of surface sanitizer and a personal pump bottle of hand sanitizer.

We are not sure if it will take all the sting out of the needed cleaning. We will see where the experiment leads!

AMT Members in Action with Covid-19 Relief efforts

We are slowly learning in a community that this thing will be a marathon not a sprint. So we are setting ourselves up with safer workspace practices to continuously offer the best most immediate help we can. We are also learning to celebrate everyone’s efforts even when is just nibbling at the problems.

Without further ado here are just a few snapshots of AMT members in action while we work to help people directly and in partnership with our fellow makerspace and non-profits.

Making DIY PPE: Best Practices for a Safer Makerspace Workplace

Disclaimer

While we have done our best to collect information from reputable sources, we are not industrial hygienists or medical professionals.  We are doing our best to be helpful in a crisis situation. These guidelines are provided “as-is” and come with no guarantee that following these guidelines will keep you 100% safe.  Use at your own risk, use combined with your own judgment, and refer to the latest scientific information available.  

Introduction

In the past few weeks, Makers everywhere have stepped up to help deal with the COVID-19 pandemic by making Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) to help keep healthcare professionals and other vulnerable people safe. However, makers becoming sick themselves, spreading the disease, and contaminating their workspaces adds to the problem and not the solution.  We are providing these best practices, gathered from medically reputable sources (such as the CDC) in an intent to provide a means of decreasing the risk of makers spreading and contracting COVID-19 while in the process of making DIY PPE.

Access control

It is very important that you control and track who is in the makerspace and when. The following is practical advice.

  • Keep isolation protocols. If people are not already living together they should not be working in the same room without masks being worn at all times. 
  • Keep 6 feet away from each other in hallways and common spaces.
  • Sanitize items handed off between individuals as much as possible
  • Make sure all people in the space making PPE are trained in the protocols for your space before allowing access (example: AMT COVID-19 Access Protocols – will link)

Personal Safety

  • First and foremost, please do not attempt to make any PPE if you or someone in your household is sick. Even if you have a small tickle in your throat, please do not make any PPE if you think you, or someone that you are exposed to may be sick.
  • Act as if you were infected by the COVID-19 virus. Wear a face mask and a fresh pair of gloves when collecting each piece of ready-to go PPE. Store the PPE immediately in a sealable bag.
  • Keep your distance: Remain no closer than ~6ft (2m) from another human
  • Wash hands for at least 20seconds with soap and water before beginning work or handling materials.
  • Don’t touch your face
  • Cough or sneeze into the crook of your elbow 
  • Sanitize your work surfaces and tools before and during PPE creation
  • Sanitize your cleaning equipment when washing fabric PPE and PPE materials

Workspace Hygiene 

    • If you can, please segregate the tools and equipment that you will be using to make the PPE in your space away from people, pets, bathrooms, or food preparation surfaces.
    • Always disinfect between users.
    • There is still debate about how long the virus survives on hard industrial surfaces, but it is currently estimated that COVID-19 can live on hard industrial surfaces (metal, plastic, and glass) for up to 3 days. If you have access to sanitizing solutions, including diluted bleach, 70% alcohol solution, or products like Star-San or Odo-Ban, please disinfect your tools and equipment before and after each item is made. You can also let packed items sit for 3 days before distributing, as another mechanism to reduce the risk of transmission.
      • For 3D printing:
        • If the machine is clean, the plastic is heated up enough to be considered clean once the print is finished.
        • Do not attempt to sterilize the finished part; just drop in a clear bag with gloves or tongs and set aside.
        • Many sterilization solutions will damage PLA, and off-the-shelf isopropyl alcohol is not concentrated enough to clean the parts
      • For sewing:
        • Store similar to N95s (allowing the mask to hang in a designated area or placed in a paper bag and labeled – with one mask per paper bag). 
        • Launder after each use. 

 

  • Do not use bleach to sanitize metal equipment or tools as it will corrode most metals.

 

If Someone Gets Infected: Clean & Disinfect

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/community/organizations/cleaning-disinfection.html

 

If someone working in the space displays symptoms or is tested positive for COVID-19, the workspace must be thoroughly cleaned and disinfected to avoid further spreading the virus to others.

Cleaning and Disinfection After Persons Suspected/Confirmed to Have COVID-19 Have Been in the Facility

Cleaning refers to the removal of dirt and impurities, including germs, from surfaces. Cleaning alone does not kill germs. But by removing the germs, it decreases their number and therefore any risk of spreading infection.

Disinfecting works by using chemicals to kill germs on surfaces. This process does not necessarily clean dirty surfaces or remove germs. But killing germs remaining on a surface after cleaning further reduces any risk of spreading infection.

  • It is recommended to close off areas used by the ill persons and wait as long as practical before beginning cleaning and disinfection to minimize potential for exposure to respiratory droplets. Open outside doors and windows to increase air circulation in the area. If possible, wait up to 24 hours before beginning cleaning and disinfection.
  • Cleaning staff should clean and disinfect all areas (e.g., offices, bathrooms, and common areas) used by the ill persons, focusing especially on frequently touched surfaces.

Surfaces

  • If surfaces are dirty, they should be cleaned using a detergent or soap and water prior to disinfection.
  • For disinfection, diluted household bleach solutions, alcohol solutions with at least 70% alcohol, and most common EPA-registered household disinfectants should be effective.
    • Diluted household bleach solutions can be used if appropriate for the surface. Follow manufacturer’s instructions for application and proper ventilation. Check to ensure the product is not past its expiration date. Never mix household bleach with ammonia or any other cleanser. Unexpired household bleach will be effective against coronaviruses when properly diluted.
  • Prepare a bleach solution by mixing:
    • 5 tablespoons (1/3rd cup) bleach per gallon of water or
    • 4 teaspoons bleach per quart of water
    • Products with EPA-approved emerging viral pathogens claims are expected to be effective against COVID-19 based on data for harder to kill viruses. Follow the manufacturer’s instructions for all cleaning and disinfection products (e.g., concentration, application method and contact time, etc.).
    • For soft (porous) surfaces such as carpeted floor, rugs, and drapes, remove visible contamination if present and clean with appropriate cleaners indicated for use on these surfaces. After cleaning:
      • If the items can be laundered, launder items in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions using the warmest appropriate water setting for the items and then dry items completely.
      • Otherwise, use products with the EPA-approved emerging viral pathogens claims (examples at this link) that are suitable for porous surfaces 

Linens, Clothing, and Other Items That Go in the Laundry

  • Do not shake dirty laundry; this minimizes the possibility of dispersing virus through the air.
  • Wash items as appropriate in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions. If possible, launder items using the warmest appropriate water setting for the items and dry items completely. Dirty laundry that has been in contact with an ill person can be washed with other people’s items.
  • Clean and disinfect hampers or other carts for transporting laundry according to guidance above for hard or soft surfaces.

Resources

 

First Round of Cutting Shield Parts at AMT

We have been cutting parts for the last couple of days for local health care folks for the Bay Area Medical Faceshield Emergency Production. Currently, they have a private Facebook group for contributors and a public facing GoFundMe campaign.

This amazing group will have a website soon but currently are focused on meeting the need and getting design verified by healthcare folks. Stay tuned for more news about this project.

This project is supported by the AMT COVID-19 Relief Fund.

 

 

Hack Your Quarantine

Bored WFH? Feeling useless, maybe scared? Wanna help?

Hack Your Quarantine

How it works

Step 1: Find a problem

Step 2: Draw a solution

Step 3: Send it in

It can be a napkin sketch or a full-blown cad file. If we have the tools and we have the materials we can give it a shot.

Step 4: We make the best ones!

#QuarantineHacks #AMTOakland